Entries by Micro Hydro

Grid-Tie Micro Hydro Videos

Two 4 nozzle X-Stream Engines were installed at the site. The piping is two 6 inch PVC pipes, running 40 feet into a lake, 50 feet over the dam, and 76 feet down the dam to the generator house. There is 34 feet of fall over the 76 foot length of piping. This is a […]

Microhydro Myths & Misconceptions

Making electricity from falling water can seem like magic, and that’s led to lots of misconceptions. Here, we’ll separate fact from fiction when it comes to what microhydro systems can and cannot do.

Connecting to the Grid: A Letter from Paul

Many people contact us concerning the possibility of using a power source that is either connected to the commercial power grid or feeding power to a house that is. While this may be possible, it is not likely to make economic sense.

Water Rights: A Microhydro Evolution

Every morning, before brushing teeth or having a look at the weather outside our Victoria, Australia, off-grid home, my wife Carrie or I pad downstairs to the battery room to check the meters that monitor our electrical system.

Microhydro-Electric Systems Simplified

If you have a suitable site, harnessing the energy in a stream or creek can be the most cost-effective way to make renewable electricity. Compared to the sun and wind’s variability, a stream’s flow is relatively consistent, making microhydro-electric system output the most predictable of all the renewable energy (RE) electrical systems.

Micro Power to the People

A letter to the editor alerted me to my chance to finally see a microhydro system. On January 18, Vivian Stockman and I visited Mickey and Jennifer Janowski, who live at an elevation of 2,250 feet in Webster County, W.Va.